Actress And Activist Jane Fonda Arrested On Us Capitol Steps

According to multiple reports online, actress and activist Jane Fonda was arrested today while participating in a climate change demonstration on the U.S. Capitol steps. Actress And Activist Jane Fonda Arrested On Us Capitol Steps

The Hollywood Reporter reports that 16 were charged with ‘crowding, obstructing or impeding’ after gathering for what police call an unlawful demonstration.


Actress And Activist Jane Fonda Arrested On Us Capitol Steps

Jane Fonda Is ‘Worried’ About Climate Activist Greta Thunberg




“Today, the United States Capitol Police arrested 16 individuals for unlawfully demonstrating on the East Front of the U.S. Capitol,” Capitol Police spokesperson Eva Mlecki said.

A reporter for one Washington, D.C. television station recorded Fonda being escorted away with her hands secured behind her back with a zip tie.


Actress And Activist Jane Fonda Arrested On Us Capitol Steps

Toronto, Ontario – September 11: Jane Fonda Attends The L’oréal In Conversation With Jane Fonda During The 2019 Toronto International Film Festival Held At Hotel X On September 11, 2019 In Toronto, Canada.




Fonda, 81, was arrested Friday alongside actresses Rosanna Arquette and Catherine Keener, both 60. The incident marked the fourth week in a row that the actress found herself handcuffed during the climate change protest. It was, however, the first time she went to jail afterward.

A spokesperson for Fonda told media outlets that the actress would be “spending the night in jail” and was set to appear in Superior Court at 10 a.m. on Saturday morning.


Actress And Activist Jane Fonda Arrested On Us Capitol Steps

Fire Drill Fridays




In October, Fonda pledged to get arrested every week that she holds the organized demonstration.

“I’m going to take my body, which is kind of famous and popular right now because of the series, and I’m going to go to D.C., and I’m going to have a rally every Friday,” she said after her first arrest. “It’ll be called ‘Fire Drill Friday.’ And we’re going to engage in civil disobedience, and we’re going to get arrested every Friday.”

Updated: 11-9-2019

Climate Activists Try to Harness Young Voters’ ‘Existential Anxiety’

Younger Americans are more likely than their older counterparts to endorse major action on climate.

Michaelyn Mankel says she felt the environment was in such peril that she dropped out of college 11 credits shy of graduating in 2018. Now, she is working to get a president elected who will aggressively target climate change.

Ms. Mankel, 24 years old, and 19 others from the political action group Sunrise Movement have collected roughly 12,000 pledges from young people across Iowa and New Hampshire to vote for candidates who support the Green New Deal, a wide-ranging and costly proposal to reshape the economy to be emissions-neutral within 10 years and shift away from fossil fuels.

Younger Americans are more likely than their older counterparts to say they are concerned about climate change and to endorse major action to combat it. Activists are hoping to harness that anxiety and use it to urge 2020 Democratic candidates to take more ambitious positions on climate issues. Then, they want young people to show up at the polls and vote for the candidate willing to be most aggressive.

Ms. Mankel generated 1.3 million views on Twitter for a September video in which she pressured Joe Biden in person for attending a fundraiser co-hosted by the founder of a liquefied natural gas company, among other things, an interaction for which she said she spent more than five hours preparing.

“I was confident that I was speaking not only for myself, but for tens of thousands of young people across the country,” said Ms. Mankel. The Biden campaign pointed out that Mr. Biden had introduced one of the first pieces of climate legislation and had a B+ rating with the environmental organization Greenpeace.

Nearly every Democratic presidential hopeful is backing a climate-change agenda that is more amenable to the activists than what the party supported in 2016. Still, activists say only a handful want the kind of drastic overhaul to the U.S. economy they believe is necessary.

Achieving that goal faces headwinds. In the past, young people have voted at lower rates than their older peers, though there was an uptick in the 2018 election, according to the U.S. Census.

A Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll from September found that while a majority of young people said the U.S. should ban offshore drilling, most voters over the age of 35 disagreed. And while almost two-thirds of young people said the U.S. should shift to renewable resources, less than half of their older peers agreed.

Ms. Mankel and her fellow canvassers stood outside the library at Iowa State University in Ames last week and asked students if they were worried about climate change. Most who walked by said they were, though many didn’t stop.

Jack Kinseth, 20, responded, “Oh my God, everything” when asked what worried him about climate change.

“The existential anxiety that comes as a result of the data pertaining to how climate change will evolve within my lifetime and over future generations, I can’t quantify it,” Mr. Kinseth said.

Another Iowa State student, James Gilpatric, 19, was standing just down the sidewalk at a table set up in support of President Trump’s re-election. He said he didn’t deny that climate change was happening, but he played down the significance.

“I don’t think it’s as big as people make it out to be. Like, I don’t think it’s an existential threat and we’re all going to die,” he said, adding he was concerned that big steps like enacting the Green New Deal could destroy the economy.

Young Democratic activists say their concern over the effects of climate change has been building due to recent floods and wildfires. The urgency increased, they said, after a 2018 report from a United Nations-led scientific panel warned of a devastating future if governments didn’t cut 2010 levels of global carbon dioxide emissions in half in 12 years and effectively end them by around 2050. Greta Thunberg, a 16-year-old Swedish activist who sailed across the Atlantic in a racing yacht to call attention to carbon footprints, has become an icon of the movement.

“There’s been a wholesale change in the sort of emotional dynamic of the climate change issue since the new generations have sparked this outcry of moral indignation,” said Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, who ran for the Democratic nomination with a focus on climate change but dropped out after failing to gain momentum.

Sunrise Movement hasn’t endorsed a candidate, but on Saturday, leaders will join Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders for a summit in Des Moines focused on the issue. Democratic New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a 30-year-old progressive, who first introduced the legislative proposal for the Green New Deal and has endorsed Mr. Sanders, will also attend.

The Vermont lawmaker says his plan would cost $16.3 trillion over a decade. He calls for 100% conversion to renewable energy sources by 2030 and complete decarbonization by 2050.

That is more ambitious than his 2016 proposal, when Mr. Sanders proposed to tax carbon emissions and ban fracking. Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, the Democratic nominee that year, pushed for renewable energy, but she didn’t endorse putting a price on carbon and said she wanted to regulate fracking, but not end the practice.

Other 2020 candidates also have far-reaching climate plans. Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has adopted Mr. Inslee’s clean energy plan as part of her proposed $3 trillion investment to combat climate change.

Updated: 11-9-2019

Fed’s Brainard Says Climate Change Might Have Implications for Neutral Interest Rate

Federal Reserve governor cited research showing more-frequent heat waves could affect economic output and labor productivity.

Federal Reserve governor Lael Brainard said the central bank is ramping up its efforts to understand the implications of climate change for monetary policy and noted that the phenomenon may have consequences for interest rates.

“To the extent that climate change and the associated policy responses affect productivity and long-run economic growth, there may be implications for the long-run neutral level of the real interest rate,” Ms. Brainard said in remarks prepared for delivery Friday at a San Francisco Fed conference on the economics of climate change. She was referring to the estimated level of interest rates, adjusted for inflation, that neither stimulates nor slows economic growth.

Ms. Brainard cited research showing that more-frequent heat waves could affect economic output and labor productivity. She said rising insurance premiums and increased spending on climate-change adaptations—such as air conditioning in places where it wasn’t previously needed, or elevating homes in areas that become more prone to flooding—“will have implications for economic activity and inflation.”

The chair of the Fed’s committee on financial stability, Ms. Brainard also highlighted potential vulnerabilities in the financial system associated with climate change and weather-related natural disasters that might become more common or intense.

“If prices of properties do not accurately reflect climate-related risks, a sudden correction could result in losses to financial institutions, which in turn reduce lending in the economy,” she said. “Banks also need to manage risks surrounding potential loan losses resulting from business interruptions and bankruptcies associated with natural disasters.”

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